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Manchester Wheel
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Between December 2004 and February 2005, Manchester was host to it's own 'big wheel'. Placed in Exchange Square, not too far from the site of the '96 bomb, it commanded spectacular views of the City Centre, especially on a clear day. And we were lucky enough to get one
           
The Wheel of Manchester in Exchange Square, just outside of Selfridge and Marks & SpencerAnd the view from the top straight down. This is the Triangle shopping centre (once called the Corn Exchange) seen from a new angle. The big black box attached to the front is a giant TV screenAnd a view over Manchester to toward the Northeast. The Manchester Evening News (MEN) Arena is in the middle and the ornate chimney behind it belongs to Manchester Prison, better known as Strangeways!
From the wheel, half-way between top and bottom, is a great view of The Printworks leisure complex and, specifically, the multi-screen and Imax cinema, called FilmWorksManchester Cathedral and a view to the north of the city and over the adjacent city of Salford. In the foreground are the two oldest pubs in Manchester - see below for a closer lookAnd at the other extreme, here is all-glass Number One Deansgate, one of the newest and most expensive blocks of flats ... sorry, apartments ... in Manchester. You'd need a million cash AND a large mortgage to even think about buying one
Just a general view across the rooftops with Cross Street below left of centre. Of the two towers you can see, the one almost hidden by the wheel is the Royal Exchange shopping centre and theatre and the one on the extreme left if the Town Hall clock towerThe newest street in the centre, New Cathedral Street. One of the legacies of the 1996 bomb which destroyed most of this part of the centre of Manchester. It now connects St. Ann's Square and Church to the CathedralThe oldest pubs in Manchester. The Wellington and Sinclairs Oyster Bar. This is their third, and hopefully last, resting place having been physically moved, brick by brick, twice before - first to the 1960's designed eyesore that was Shambles Square (now demolished, thankfully) and now to a more fitting position near to the Cathedral
 

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